Knitting Nuances
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Tips for Knitting in the Round
When you join stitches "in the round" you create a continuous tube -- connecting the first cast on stitch to the last. Here's How to Join in the Round on 2 Circular Needles:

1. Distribute your stitches evenly around the needle.
2. Hold the needle with the first stitch you cast on in your left hand and the needle with the last stitch you cast on in you right hand. Check yourself: Is your working yarn -- the yarn connected to the ball -- attached to the stitch on your right needle?
3. Ensure the cast on edges of all stitches are facing in the same direction. This prevents the stitches from "twisting".
4. Place a stitch marker on the right needle to indicate the beginning of a new round.
5. Knit the first stitch on the left needle, pulling the yarn tightly to avoid a hole.
6. Continue until all stitches have been knit and you're back to the stitch marker. This completes one round.
When joining stitches in the round, it's tricky to create a seamless join even if you knit the first stitch tightly. Here's a trick we like and something you might want to try. Here's How.

Before placing your stitch marker and knitting the first stitch, swap the first stitches on the left and right needles as follows:
1. Slip the first stitch on the right needle to the left needle.
2. Slip the second stitch on the left needle up and over the first stitch and onto the right needle.
3. Place a stitch marker on the right needle to indicate the beginning of a new round.
4. Knit the first stitch on the left needle.
5. Continue until all stitches have been knit and you're back to the stitch marker. This completes one round.
If working with double-pointed needles (DPNs) isn’t for you try knitting in the round with 2 circular needles! This method is great for the tops of hats, socks and gloves. It is important to compare the two methods before you get started:

DoublePointedNeedles: Stitches are split between 3 or 4 needles. The free needle is used to knit the stitches from the full left hand needle to the empty right hand needle. Thus, the stitches are passed from one needle to the next.

Circular Needles: Stitches are split between 2 needles. There is no extra needle. The stitches on Needle A will always stay on needle A and The stitches on Needle B will always stay on needle B. Think of this more like parallel knitting - work the stitches on Needle A using both ends of Needle A then turn your work over and work the stitches on Needle B using both ends of Needle B. The needle not in use is just hanging around waiting for its turn.

There are real benefits to working with 2 circulars:

Knitting with two ends of the same needle (as usual) feels less awkward for many knitters. Stitches split over fewer needles are faster to knit. Stitches are more secure on the cable of a circular needle.

There are a number of wonderful videos by Cat Borhdi the creator of this method available on You Tube. You can find them
here.